Tag Archives | kanji

Sakura and Koi Wall Hangings

Hello everyone, it’s Holly posting today.  Remember the gorgeous collage paper that Art Neko created based on one of my cards?  I’ve used that sakura collage paper on this trio of wall hangings to share with you.  I stamped an assortment of koi and kanji on each of the three pieces.

I started by cutting out the Spring Summer Collage Sheet with scissors.  I trimmed each one to fit onto the ATC Masonite Blanks from B-Muse.  Next, I stamped the 3 Bold Koi and the kanji on each piece with a dark blue ink.  Then I glued the stamped collage sheets down onto the ATC Masonite Blanks, being careful not to get any wrinkles or bubbles in the paper as I pressed it down.

For the hangers, I glued them on with some liquid glue to the back of each piece.  I set some heavy blocks on them and let them dry overnight.  These are ready to hang up in my studio as soon as I finish hammering some nails into the wall.  I still have 6 ATC collage pieces left from the sheet, so I’ll be making more projects with those soon.  You can stamp anything you want on these collage sheets, and I’m looking forward to seeing all the different possibilities.

 

Items used on my project today:

Spring Summer Collage Sheet

3 Bold Koi stamps

Assorted Japanese Kanji stamps

ATC Masonite Blanks with Wall Hangers from B-Muse

 

 

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Chinese Chop Signature

Good Morning,  it is Shirley posting today.  I have made a Asian card to share with you. I used the Calligraphy and Chinese Chop Signature along with the Bamboo and Kanji Bookmark.

 

Here is some information on the Chopped Calligraphy Stamp that I received from Annette.  The Japanese Kanji is a personalized signature and “chop” of an artist.  As you already know,  Asian artists sign their work with a stamp, a chop, in red. It is usually a square, a rectangle, an oval, or a combination of geometric shapes with Kanji or Chinese script inside the geometric shape. This design is extra special because it has three parts: the usual rectangle at the bottom left, a large central Kanji with a notation on the right that is smaller. This type of combination I have seen only in twentieth century signatures. Sometimes it will include not just the chop identifying the artist, but where the item was created, an actual date, a title for the art piece  and or a personal comment about the art by the artist.  This specific Japanese Kanji is some of the newest we have found from the late twentieth century.

Thanks, so much for joining us today. Have a great weekend.

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Pretty Pink Peonies with Kanji

Hello, everyone.   It is Shirley posting today. I have made a card using the Art Neko
Peonies and Kanji stamps – A3740008.

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I started by stamping my peonies on white card stock. I colored them with copics. I stamped the Kanji using Versamark ink, sprinkled gold embossing powder over it and used my heat gun to activate the embossing powder.

I added an olive lacy square over the top of the image. I adhered the lace square to my designer paper and the olive card base.

Thank you, for stopping in to look at my card today.

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Washi Paper Weaving with Kanji by Holly Brown

 

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Hi everyone!  It’s Holly posting today.  I’m sneaking in a surprise post this weekend, and I created this paper weaving background to share with you.  There is a special Yahoo group called Oriental Stamp Art, and the technique challenge for September 2016 is weaving.  We can do any kind of weaving, so I chose to weave some strips of washi paper with some strips of brushed gold cardstock.  I wanted to be able to see most of the beautiful washi paper so I only used five little strips of gold cardstock in a very loose weave.  The kanji sentiment, found on this sheet from Art Neko, was stamped with Versamark onto black cardstock and embossed with gold embossing powder.

The Oriental Stamp Art group is very active with lots of swaps, mingles, contests, and artwork sharing.  If you are interested in this group, you can join by checking it out here.  Just click on the “Join” button and follow the directions.  After you’ve been approved, you’ll be able to see all the artwork and join in by sharing your own Oriental artwork.  If you’d like more information, OSA also has a blog here.  Please feel free to check it out by clicking on the tabs at the top of the page.  It is a wonderful resource for Asian culture and artwork and techniques.

I hope you have a wonderful weekend!

 

 

 

 

 

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